Equitable Transit Oriented Development Policy Plan

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Review the Draft ETOD Policy Plan and Take the Survey Before December 2nd!

Welcome!

Thank you for your interest in the latest draft of the Equitable Transit-Oriented Development (ETOD) Policy Plan! On this page, you'll find:

  • A quick introduction to equitable transit-oriented development
  • The Housing and Planning Department’s Draft ETOD Policy Plan (above, or click here)
  • Some important dates (right) for other opportunities to give feedback on the Draft ETOD Policy Plan
  • A survey to tell us your thoughts on the Draft ETOD Policy Plan (below, or click here).

What is ETOD?

The general practice of transit-oriented development, or TOD, refers to the development of transit stops within walking distance to clusters of different types of places, such as housing, shops, and offices. ETOD, or equitable transit-oriented development, acknowledges that not everyone has benefitted equally from traditional TOD planning. By engaging with community in more meaningful ways and in all phases of the planning process, ETOD seeks to undo the harms of past planning practices and build communities in which all are safe, supported, and have the resources to thrive. You can read more about Austin’s ETOD efforts in Project Connect here: https://projectconnect.com/projects/etod

ETOD in the Draft Policy Plan

The Draft ETOD Policy Plan is a set of guidelines to help the Austin community equitably put transit-oriented development in place. These guidelines seek to support residents of all incomes and backgrounds, especially those who have been hurt by past transportation and planning decisions. The Draft ETOD Policy Plan was written by the City of Austin’s Housing and Planning Department along with partners at CapMetro (Austin’s transit authority), the Austin Transit Partnership (ATP), and the community. Together, they created the goals for ETOD in Austin, the tools that can help us reach those goals, and the actions we must take to make equity possible in the transit system. To learn more about how various community engagement efforts led to the creation of important elements in the Draft ETOD Policy Plan, check out the section on the right entitled "Community Engagement Process," or click here!

The Housing and Planning Department welcomes your thoughts on the Draft ETOD Policy Plan and invites you to take the survey below, make a comment, ask a question, or do all three! For public comment opportunities at Boards and Commissions briefings or City Council, see the “Key Dates” section on the right.

If you're having an issue viewing the full survey, click here.

Review the Draft ETOD Policy Plan and Take the Survey Before December 2nd!

Welcome!

Thank you for your interest in the latest draft of the Equitable Transit-Oriented Development (ETOD) Policy Plan! On this page, you'll find:

  • A quick introduction to equitable transit-oriented development
  • The Housing and Planning Department’s Draft ETOD Policy Plan (above, or click here)
  • Some important dates (right) for other opportunities to give feedback on the Draft ETOD Policy Plan
  • A survey to tell us your thoughts on the Draft ETOD Policy Plan (below, or click here).

What is ETOD?

The general practice of transit-oriented development, or TOD, refers to the development of transit stops within walking distance to clusters of different types of places, such as housing, shops, and offices. ETOD, or equitable transit-oriented development, acknowledges that not everyone has benefitted equally from traditional TOD planning. By engaging with community in more meaningful ways and in all phases of the planning process, ETOD seeks to undo the harms of past planning practices and build communities in which all are safe, supported, and have the resources to thrive. You can read more about Austin’s ETOD efforts in Project Connect here: https://projectconnect.com/projects/etod

ETOD in the Draft Policy Plan

The Draft ETOD Policy Plan is a set of guidelines to help the Austin community equitably put transit-oriented development in place. These guidelines seek to support residents of all incomes and backgrounds, especially those who have been hurt by past transportation and planning decisions. The Draft ETOD Policy Plan was written by the City of Austin’s Housing and Planning Department along with partners at CapMetro (Austin’s transit authority), the Austin Transit Partnership (ATP), and the community. Together, they created the goals for ETOD in Austin, the tools that can help us reach those goals, and the actions we must take to make equity possible in the transit system. To learn more about how various community engagement efforts led to the creation of important elements in the Draft ETOD Policy Plan, check out the section on the right entitled "Community Engagement Process," or click here!

The Housing and Planning Department welcomes your thoughts on the Draft ETOD Policy Plan and invites you to take the survey below, make a comment, ask a question, or do all three! For public comment opportunities at Boards and Commissions briefings or City Council, see the “Key Dates” section on the right.

If you're having an issue viewing the full survey, click here.

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This is nothing but CodeNext revisited. Planning to redevelop affordable homes within 1/2 mile of stations is an insult to those of us who live here already. City Hall is intent on displacing existing residents to make space for higher-income newcomers. And it is overreach to treat bus (i.e. MetroRapid) stations the same as light rail stations.

Mike Mike2 8 days ago

If city council passes in December the compatibility on corridors amendment there is an awkward situation where most of the light rail sites (Justin Lamar) are capped at 60' due to the TOD zoning while other corridor sites would be able to get 90' and higher in some places. this should be addressed and amended in the upcoming council meeting as there is bigger development pressure closer to the light rail and stations.

CHoshen 19 days ago

Compatibility should be eliminated in all Station Areas as a first step. Missing Middle transects should be applied through the planning process.

gregkiloh about 1 month ago

'Soft density' should include fourplexes as they are allowed under standard federal residential housing mortgage guidelines (a fourplex is a house) and are among the most cost efficient housing forms. Allowing more units within the same building envelope encourages smaller, more naturally affordable units.

gregkiloh about 1 month ago

Minimum parking requirements should be eliminated in all TOD areas if not city-wide. Parking caps and disincentives should be utilized as well.

gregkiloh about 1 month ago

Station Areas such as Springdale and along Riverside on the Blue Line are under immense development pressure and have significant redevelopment potential due to vacant and underutilized land and should be elevated to High Priority. Station Areas such as Mueller and Seaholm are mostly built out with recent development and have very limited redevelopment potential and should be Low priority for planning services.

gregkiloh about 1 month ago
Page last updated: 05 Dec 2022, 01:47 PM